Last edited by Marn
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Kumuhonua legends found in the catalog.

Kumuhonua legends

Dorothy B. BarreМЂre

Kumuhonua legends

a study of late 19th century Hawaiian stories of creation and origins

by Dorothy B. BarreМЂre

  • 153 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Anthropology, Bernice P. Bishop Museum in Honolulu .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Hawaii
    • Subjects:
    • Legends -- Hawaii -- History -- 19th century.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 43-44.

      Statement[by] Dorothy B. Barrère.
      SeriesPacific anthropological records,, no. 3
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBL2620.H3 B3
      The Physical Object
      Paginationii, 47 p.
      Number of Pages47
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5293872M
      LC Control Number72016069

      Full text of "Hawaiian folk tales; a collection of native legends" See other formats. Hawaii. White sands, warm waters, year-round sunshine, ukulele music—there's a reason Hawaii is pretty much synonymous with paradise. Okay, maybe not the ukulele part.

      Aloha Ke Akua Ministries Books. God of Light, God of Darkness Book - This story is the chronicle of the spiritual history of Hawai‘i. It is the story of the battle between light and darkness – good and evil – in a titanic clash for spiritual supremacy over the islands of Hawai‘i and her people. This story may read like an exciting fiction novel but the miraculous events in this book. The Kumuhonua Legends: A Study of Late 19th Century Hawaiian Stories of Creation and Origins. Honolulu: Pacific Anthropological Records 3. Brusca, M. & Wilson, T.

      ETHNOGRAPHY AND ETHNOLOGY: The Kumuhonua Legends: A Study of Late 19th Century Hawaiian Stories of Creation and Origins. D orothy B. B arrère. William J. Wallace; Pages: ; First Published: August   According to those legends of Kumuhonua and Wela-ahi-lani, &#;at the time when the gods created the stars, they also created a multitude of angels, or spirits (i kini akua), who were not created like men, but made from the spittle of the gods (i kuhaia), to be their servants or messengers.


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Kumuhonua legends by Dorothy B. BarreМЂre Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Kumuhonua Legends: A Study of Late 19th Century Hawaiian Stories of Creation and Origins. Dorothy B. Barrère. Department of Anthropology, Bernice P. Bishop Museum, - Legends - 47 pages.

0 Reviews. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Contents. Introduction. Kumuhonua was a son of the High Chief Mulielealiʻi of Oahu.

Mulielealiʻi was a son of the famous Kumuhonua legends book Maweke from Tahiti. Kumuhonuaʻs mother was called Wehelani, and Kumuhonuaʻs siblings were Chief Moʻikeha of Kauai, Chief ʻOlopana and Princess Hainakolo. ʻOlopana went to Tahiti. It seems that Kumuhonua was the eldest child of his parents.

Get this from a library. The Kumuhonua legends; a study of late 19th century Hawaiian stories of creation and origins. [Dorothy B Barrère]. Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse.

YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Kumuhonua (First Man) Your search retrieved 13 references. Results are displayed in order by Subject, Source, Legend. Subject: Kumuhonua (First Man) appears in the legend: "Around the Poi Bowl" in the book: Westervelt, W.

D., Around the Poi Bowl and Legend of Paao on. A strong attack on the authenticity of Hawaiian legends and traditions with Old Testament overtones has been made in connection with the Kumuhonua legends, describing the creation of the earth and of Hawaii and of the origins of the Hawaiians, which were published by Abraham Fornander inin An Account of the Polynesian Race.

According to those legends of Kumuhonua and Wela-ahi-lani, “at the time when the gods created the stars, they also created a multitude of angels, or spirits (i kini akua), who were not created like men, but made from the spittle of the Kumuhonua legends book (i kuhaia), to be their servants or messengers.

The Kumuhonua Legends. A study of late 19th century Hawaiian stories of creation and origins. Pacific Anthropological Records No. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, Blackman, Maralyn.

Hōkūleʻa. Honolulu: Polynesian Voyaging Society, (Book 4 in a series for children on sea voyaging.). According to those legends of Kumuhonua and p. 18 [paragraph continues] Wela-ahi-lani, "at the time when the gods created the stars, they also created a multitude of angels, or spirits (i kini akua), who were not created like men, but made from the spittle of the gods (i kuhaia), to be their servants or messengers.

The Kumuhonua Legends are the writings and genealogies which have been recorded by the Hawaiians Kamakau and Kepelino. Both of these men’s accounts are quoted by Abraham Fornander, (his book Account of the Polynesian Race is referred to over 25 times) and it is on these published writings that Kikawa based a good portion of his book.

The Kumuhonua legends: a study of late 19th century Hawaiian stories of creation and origins / [by] Dorothy B. Barrère Dept. of Anthropology, Bernice P. Bishop Museum Honolulu Australian/Harvard Citation. The Kumuhonua Legends: A Study of Late 19th Century Hawaiian Stories of Creation and Origins.

Pacific Anthropological Records, No. 3, Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI,p. 19– Kunyan Alaska Gaster p. – Wissaketchak Cree (Native Americans) Frazer, p.

– Nanaboujou Ottawa (Native Americans) Frazer, p. File Size: 4MB. Ku and Hina-man andwoman-were the great ancestral gods of heaven and earth for the ancientHawaiians.

They were life's fruitfulness and all the generations of mankind, both those who are to come and those already Hawaiian gods werelike great chiefs from far lands who visited among the people, entering their dailylives sometimes as humans or animals, 4/5(1).

Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse. YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Kumuhonua (Place) Your search retrieved 1 reference. Subject: Kumuhonua (Place) appears in the legend: "Story of the Formation of these Islands and Origin of this Race" in the book: Fornander, Abraham, Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore, Volume 4.

Barrere's Kumuhonua Legends a useful grain of salt to go with Fornander's earlier history, but as is said in Kenneth Emory's preface to that work, once Fornander reaches the period from the late migrations to Kamehameha, "His handling of this period is authoritative, masterful and indispensable to an understanding of it.".

Enclosed at long last. is the book On tapu. All the feed-back from Maori who have read it has so far been very good. (letter. May 9, ) E.g. Handy Similarly.

the Kumuhonua legends ancient by Beckwith ; Simpson   In myths and legends, the mention of a bird usually brings about the same imagery of one coming to tattle tale.

The news may either be good or bad. Punalua – The tradition of spouses sharing a spouse, as two husbands of a wife, or two wives of a husband.

In response to repeated requests, the compiler now presents in book form the series of legends that have been made a feature of “The Hawaiian Annual” for a number of years past. The series has been enriched by the addition of several tales, the famous shark legend having been furnished for this purpose from the papers of the Hawaiian.

See Reading List for the Kumuhonua Legends, by Dorothy B. Barrere, 4. What type of introduced stories may have been responsible for reducing the Hawaiian menehune to dwarf-like size.

See Kumuhonua Legends. Student Activities. Students should learn one or more legends in which the scene is laid in their home section of the island. Ladd, Edmund J. Overview. Works: 40 works in 75 publications in 1 language and library holdings (Book) 3 editions published The Kumuhonua legends; a study of late 19th century Hawaiian stories of creation and origins by Dorothy B Barrère (Book) 2 editions published.

THE MOIKEHA-LA‘A MIGRATION. FROM Ulu and Nana-ulu, sons of Ki‘i, twelfth in succession from Wakea and Papa, all high chief families count descent.

it is the children of the first about whom legends are told today. Of the three sons of Mulieleali‘i, Kumuhonua, Moikeha, and Olopana, it is the firstborn, Kumuhonua, who succeeds to his. Working with like-minded Maori intellectuals and community members, Shirres was anxious to have their approval: Enclosed at long last.

is the book On tapu. All the feed-back from Maori who have read it has so far been very good. (letter. May 9, ) E.g. Handy Similarly. the Kumuhonua legends ancient by Beckwith ; Simpson Kumuhonua invites Lono to live with them in the land beneath the sea, to eat from these plants and learn about how to cultivate them for the people in his island home.

Lono the the Magical Land Beneath the Sea was adapted from Mary Kawena Pukui's translation of "Moolelo Kahiko no Kumuhonu," held in the Bishop Museum Archives.Perpetuated in Righteousness (Book) From the ancient Polynesian legends the author traces the history of the Hawaiian people from the beginning of time to the present; documenting their belief in the One Supreme God who created the heavens and the earth; and the first man, Atea, the Kumuhonua.

Formed on the sixth day of creation out of the red.